Re: [RFC] pcibus_to_node implementation for ia64

From: colin ngam <cngam_at_sgi.com>
Date: 2005-05-12 01:44:22
Jesse Barnes wrote:

Hi Jesse,

>On Tuesday, May 10, 2005 7:42 pm, colin ngam wrote:
>  
>
>>This is the correct result - with respect to which node the
>>bus/device/function is directly connected.
>>    
>>
>
>Not really, since the kernel is only aware of nodes (for most purposes) 
>that actually have memory.  If the I/O and memoryless nodes were listed 
>in the SLIT and SRAT tables, this would be the case (the kernel would 
>build empty node structures for those nodes), but it's not at the 
>moment.
>  
>
Fine line here .. a valid node id is always returned and that nodeid is 
a vaild node id for addressing the bus/devices and may be the only node 
id you can use to address these buses and devices, except when the IO 
Brick is dual ported.  It is valid with respect to addressing the 
bus/devices but may not be "valid" with respect to "having Memory" or 
"having cpus".  Depends on what you expect :-)  Depends on how you want 
to use it :-)  Irrespective, headless and memoryless nodes will exist on 
the system, therefore you cannot assume that the node id that is used in 
addressing the pci bus is actually a node that contains memory or cpus.

>  
>
>>Either than using this 
>>function in pcibus_to_cpumask(), what other purpose is this routine
>>targeted?
>>    
>>
>
>You mean 'other than pcibus_to_cpumask'?  The idea is to use it for 
>memory allocation in device drivers, as well as the obvious use in the 
>actual DMA mapping layer (e.g. pci_alloc_consistent).  It could also be 
>used to simplify the interrupt targetting code a little, iirc, assuming 
>the above condition was met (that is, that all nodes, regardless of 
>configuration, had pgdat structures associated with them).
>
>  
>
>>Depending on what you want, you have to test the node id to see if it
>>contains memory or if it contains cpus or both.
>>    
>>
>
>That's certainly another way to go--just make the function do a search 
>to find the closest node with memory (and/or CPUs) all by itself.  The 
>obvious disadvantage is that you'll incur that cost on every function 
>call unless you build a lookup table at boot time or somesuch.
>  
>
How often do you do this to worry about latency?

>  
>
>>There is always a node associated with the device - the issue is that
>>the node may not have cpu but has memory, or may not have both memory
>>and cpu.
>>    
>>
>
>That's where things get confusing, since 'node' is an overloaded term 
>here.  It does *not* return a node that you can pass into 
>alloc_pages_node for instance, which I think is what Christoph wants.  
>It does, however, return a node id in the cnodeid sense, but one that 
>could be useless in most parts of the kernel.
>  
>
Exactly.

Thanks.

colin

>Jesse
>  
>

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Received on Wed May 11 11:46:14 2005

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